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Feeling Of Presence: Of Lost Illusion

Frequency Drift were, to me, one of the more underrated progressive rock outfits of recent times, so when it emerged that one of their main members was crafting a new venture, naturally, my interest was piqued. Keyboard player, synth master, guitarist and bassist Andreas Hack is the man in question and with his Feeling Of Presence project, he reveals that he is Of Lost Illusion. Here Hack expands his musical remit, enlisting only the help of drummer Wolfgang Osterman and e-harp/mellotron player Nerissa Schwarz (both also of Frequency Drift) to help in realising what is an ambitious project.

Deeply ensconced in what feels like the world of movie/TV soundtracks, the themes on this album hit home as though we are in a space opera where a mix of post-rock expansiveness is melded to a claustrophobic, near classical darkness, leaving the illusion (pardon the pun) of this album floating in a huge inky black void that would feel crushingly small to anyone left isolated by its vastness. Personally, while finding the results to be hugely engaging, there was, throughout, a niggling sensation where I couldn’t quite place exactly what musical memory the mood, atmospheres and indeed, the occasional motif sparked in my mind. In truth, I’m still not 100% certain that I’ve answered those questions for myself and yet, while - and I’d guess intentionally - a host of more current science fiction based music is alluded to, it’s the spectacular soundtrack work of Hans Zimmer and Christian Lundberg for the BBC Sounds podcast 13 Minutes To The Moon (a compelling recount of the final 13 minutes before Apollo 11 landed on the moon in 1969) which I can’t quite shake off as I voyage through this album. That in itself is a huge compliment, because the music for that show is quite stunning and to be fair to Feeling Of Presence - intentional or not as those touching points may or may not be - the loose similarities appear through completely different instrumentation and a much more organic starting point.

The effect is impressive, fully immersive and completely believable, each of the six tracks included weaving enigmatic soundscapes that pull you in through their tense atmospheres, while holding the attention via some impressive arrangements and the clever use of dynamics. One moment you can be caressed by the gentle keyboard motifs and beats of “Venus Transit”, while the next the grating, jarring guitars of “Room Number 105” have you transfixed in a completely different manner.

We all bring our own ‘baggage’ to the music we listen to and there’s no doubt that my own love of TV music has influenced my thoughts on Of Lost Illusion. However, I’d suggest that anyone excited by cleverly constructed, visually conjuring progressive meanderings with an occasional harder edge, will find a huge amount to enjoy here. I know that I have.

Track Listing
1. A Weird Form of Darkness
2. Room Number 105
3. Of Lost Illusion
4. Fluorescent Detail
5. Hollow Innocence
6. Venus Transit

Added: September 19th 2021
Reviewer: Steven Reid
Score:
Related Link: Of Lost Illusion @ bandcamp
Hits: 359
Language: english

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